The trucks, you know, are ready to go now
The road is long through the soft falling snow
Kyiv lies waiting in the early morning
Can they see us at night? I just don’t know
I’m too nervous to light a cigarette
Anyway I don’t ever smoke, at all
There’s plenty smoke and fire to go around
Driving without lights is like driving blind
I don’t have a truck’s licence or a gun
But they need bullets, and food before dawn

Written for dverse, a 10 line poem with ten syllables per line

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Today, I walked down to the lake, a minute or two away from my caravan, as I usually do, either in the fresh crisp morning air, or in the smooth evenings, when the diamond lights of Montreux grow across the bay, as dusk falls. But today was special. Today was beautiful. I felt energised, excited even, to be out, with big, gentle snowflakes adding layers upon layer to deep snow— and all in one morning! How exciting change can be!
By the lake I stood quite alone, content, in awe almost. And I looked down, noticed I was wearing slippers, in my eagerness to go outside and experience the winter. So I stood with frozen feet, but not willing to move from my position on the front row of my reverie.

in the snow
one set of footprints
—mine

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In Yakutian Meadows

A piece of ethnic copper art I gave back, but a photograph I was urged to keep

written for dversepoets.com

Where is she now
The girl whose picture I found
Framed and bound in cuneiform copper design

Sitting among spring grasses
Eyes sparkling bright, embedded in her heirloom

What were her dreams, then
Were they of the Siberian shaman, who speak in symbols and howl to the wolves

And who tap messages into copper settings,
Of the mythical world tree, and summer solstice sun

Which wild petals did she take home and press
The girl from Yakutia whose copper-mounted photo I found
Tucked in the antique chest I bought last night
From the silver-haired woman, whose eyes shone so bright?

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A few thoughts on the Winter War, November 1939 to April 1940

When the Soviet Union invaded Finland, battles raged in Finnish forests all winter. Finns resorted to methods such as cooking sausages to attract starved Soviet troops, with snipers lying in wait, such as Simo Häyhä, who lay in the snow for hours, at –45°C.

Finnish troops included frontline synagogues.

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